Other Helpful Information

This information is not required by MFP but feel free to complete the documents and print them out for your own records. Some of this information is required for the Funeral Director, the rest is just for your personal use.

Your Personal Details

Listed below is information that the funeral director of your choice will require when making funeral arrangements.

  • Deceased names
  • Deceased place of birth (if born overseas year of arrival in Australia)
  • Deceased parents name’s and occupations
  • Deceased marriage details (if married more than once, other marriage details)
  • Children’s names and date of birth

Having this information ready will help the Funeral Director meet the needs of the Plan Owner and the Plan Owner’s Family more effectively.

Click here to get a copy of this information in a form that you may complete and print. Alternately, click here to download the information in Acrobat Reader Format (PDF).

 

Your Funeral Instructions

  • What is your Religion/Faith
  • Buried or Cremated
  • Hymns and Flowers Etc

Click here to get a copy of this information in a form that you may complete and print. (Your Instructions). Alternately, click here to download the information in Acrobat Reader Format (PDF).

 

Your Other Documents

This is a record of where your important documents and accounts have been kept.

  • Your Will
  • Your Bank Accounts
  • Tax File Number etc

Click here to get a copy of this information in a form that you may complete and print. (Your Other Documents and Information). Alternately, click here to download the information in Acrobat Reader Format (PDF).

 

Understanding the need for a Will

At any one time up to 48 percent of adults do not have a valid will. Each year approximately 30 percent of people who die do so intestate, that is, they don’t leave a valid will. People appear to be reluctant to accept the fact that they may die or they simply misunderstand what is needed to make a valid will. For more information on the importance of wills. Click here for a copy that you may print. (Why you should make a will)

 

Enduring Power of Attorney EPA

A Power of Attorney is a document by which a person or company ('donor') appoints another person or company (the 'Attorney') to act for

  • the donor generally in all affairs or
  • for a particular period or
  • for a particular purpose.

Each Australian State and Territory has its own laws in relation to Powers of Attorney. The Commonwealth does not have laws in this regard.

An Attorney is an agent for the donor of the Power. Consequently an Attorney is subject to the donor's direction.

A donor may give notice to the Attorney terminating the authority to act. Death automatically brings an Attorney's authority to an end.

The most recent changes to Powers of Attorney provide for "Enduring Powers" which enable an Attorney to act even when a donor is incapacitated eg. in coma. Enduring Powers are now in wide use.

Anyone in business or who is 'an older citizen' should appoint an Attorney. The Attorney does not have to act continuously for them, but can simply be there as a 'backstop'. It is very easy to make a Power.

For more information on the importance of Power of Attorney click here.